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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
military engagements in iraq, afghanistan, and now libya. i speak of the need also of a new smart security to keep america safe. today will be my 399th speech. i look forward to reaching number 400 next week, and i will continue this until my last day as a member of congress, which gives me approximately 18 months, 1 1/2 years, time to bring our troops safely home. during this week, the week that the house is debating the appropriations, i thought it would be fitting to focus on more spending, on the staggering costs that taxpayers are being asked to bear for our military occupation. $10 billion a month is a lot of money, and that's the price tag for the privilege of continuing to wage a 10-year war against afghanistan. $10 billion a month. the american people who are writing that check have a right to ask and to get answers to some very important questions. where is that money going and what exactly is it accomplishing? what are we getting for our $10 billion a month? are we more secure here at home? is the afghanistan central government introducing the rule of law? have we not already de
who are killing u.s. troops in afghanistan. this is the story that's just coming in. and how much are house democrats willing to give to raise the debt limit? i'll ask the democratic party chairwoman about possible cut. she's walk into "the situation room" right now. congresswoman, stand by. >>> the clock is ticking towards a possible default of the nation's debt. the democratic party chair in the congress certainly has a lot op her plate right now with the debt crisis. everything else, as well as a very, very strong verbal showdown with a republican colleague of hers from florida. she's here in the situation room. congressman, thanks very much for coming in. let's talk about substance first and then you can talk about this riff you have with this congressman. the gang of six is out with a plan. the president warmly embracing it, even though there are cuts in medicare for the elderly included. is this something you can live with? >> well, i think the really good and big news out of that gang of six is prose sal is that there are finally republicans, particularly in the senate that
now. everybody wants to talk about the wars in iraq and afghanistan. george afghanistan. george bush left office, he left a deficit of under $1 trillion. that is an obama stimulus package for one year and that was enough to hold us in iraq and afghanistan for seven years. host: let's go to a democratic caller in brooklyn, new york. caller in brooklyn, new york. caller: i think the numbers of the other caller are totally false. obama should keep his footing in this situation. the republicans say they will walk away and limit the amount of money but they will talk about that is on the table is preposterous. it is showing that they are scared and they are finally realizing that obama has an understanding of the economy and he has an understanding and backing of the people. right now is the time to change the way we need to move forward in terms of fiscal responsibility and in terms of paying our bills. with john boehner trying to figure out which way his caucus will both and which -- vote, he will lose his job and we will not be able to rectify the things that are wrong with the economy
. when you don't pay for two wars in iraq and afghanistan and you borrow all the money from china, you're going to have to pay for that at some point. >> mentioning social security. in the president's deficit commission report, they say, among other things, without action, the benefits currently pledged under social security are a promise we cannot keep. do you think changes need to be made to social security for future generations or not? >> absolutely. you said the operative word. future generations. we're not talking about balancing the budgets today for future generations. we're doing it because if we don't do it today, the person who has to pay that mortgage tomorrow will find interest rates will have shot up. we're trying to take care of past debts. remember, the debt ceiling vote is about past debts. it's not about future negotiations. social security will be good for the next quarter century. we should do something to make sure after that quarter century, we're not paying $0.78 on the dollar in deficit. >> last year, for the first time since the 80's, social security paid in
afghanistan and iraq is just not credible. we don't know what the obstacles are going to be in afghanistan and possibly iraq. we also don't know what we might have to do in the middle east going forward. afghanistan is not settled, mr. president, and we have to have a certain level of stability on the ground in afghanistan or we will have wasted the billions that we have already spent and the lives of our military personnel in afghanistan because it will go back to the way it was before, a center for terrorism that will come to our country or can come to our country. it did once already and we have been over there to try to wipe out al qaeda and the taliban, which has been in league with al qaeda. we have been over there losing american lives and spending american taxpayer dollars to protect our coury from another 9/11. to say that we're going to cut $1 trillion in the future over the next ten years when we aren't placing the emphasis on what are the conditions on the ground is not sound policy and it's certainly not sound national security policy. so that's illusory. and then the other pa
for two wars in iraq and afghanistan and you borrow all the money from china, you are going to have to pay for it at some point. >> bret: you mention social security in the president's deficit commission report, they say among other things without action the benefits currently pledged under social security are promise we cannot keep. do you think changes need to be made to social security for future generations or not? >> absolutely. you said the operative words. "future generations." we're not talking about balancing the budgets today for future generations. we're doing it because if we don't do it today, the person who pay the mortgage tomorrow see it shot up. this is not about the future obligation. social security will be good for the next quarter century. we should do something after the quarter century, we are not paying 78 cents on the dollar but we're paying 100% on the dollar. >> bret: last year for the first time since the '80s, social security paid out more benefit than it took in payroll taxes. correct? >> true. >> bret: essentially, correct me if i'm wrong, the social security
every month for military operations in afghanistan alone to prop up a corrupt and incompetent karzai government. how about ending wasteful subsidies to big agriculture companies? how about asking billionaire hedge fund managers to pay the same tax rates as their secretaries? the truth is that the best way to deal with our long-term fiscal situation is to grow our economy. that means creating jobs and putting people back to work. the last election i thought was about jobs. we haven't talked about jobs at all since the new republican majority became -- came to power. that means investing in things like education and infrastructure and green technology and medical research. that's the kind of economic future the american people deserve. the boehner default plan would take us exactly in the wrong direction and urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to reject it. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california has 5 1/2 minutes remaining. the gentleman is recognized. mr. dreier: mr
to the war in afghanistan. he's given on taxes. he mised a huge opportunity in my opinion there. why can't the republicans just open their minds a little bit, give a little bit. go back on a commitment to make something happen. >> obama is wrong. >> he's not wrong. >> he had a $780 billion stimulus. the $700 billion tarp, three deficits for $1.5 trillion. we have the fete pumping in $600 billion. it hasn't worked. and so it hasn't -- if it hasn't worked, cohen calls this a cult. the cult won 63 seats. six months ago. what happened to his party. >> thankfully we didn't listen to republicans on the carr industry without the investment the american people made, we would have lost gm, chrysler, ford, and lost our ability on the global stage too. thank god we ignored the republicans when it came to saving the financial system without it. it was the right thing to do for them to pay them back. but what i want to know, ray torically, is where was the team party when bush ran the debt up. they were absent. this isn't as much political as it is substance. i don't doubt they have considerable repu
discharged veteran? >> we have all of these and people coming back from iraq and afghanistan. they have made incredible sacrifices. they have taken on incredible responsibilities. you see a 23-year-old leading a platoon in dangerous circumstances, making decisions, operating complex technologies. these are folks that can perform. unfortunately, a lot of these young veterans have a higher and to limit rate than people who did not serve. -- have a higher unemployment rate than people who did not serve. we want to combine a tax credit for a company that hires veterans with a campaign to have private companies step up and do the right thing and hire more veterans. in the federal government, we have made huge emphasis on ramping up our outreach to veterans and the hiring of veterans. this is been a top priority of mine. the notion that these folks who have sacrificed for our freedom and security are coming home and not able to find a job, i think that is unacceptable. >> this next question was heavily re-tweeted and voted up by our user base. this is about the debt ceiling and tax cuts. >> the as
of iraq and afghanistan, it would take a serious look out of social security and medicare and in many cases contributing to this deficit. and it would say that those who benefit from ethanol subsidies and oil company tax breaks, the wealthiest people in this country would have to pay a little bit more to pay their fair share. something like that is what should be on the floor here this afternoon because it can pass, the president can sign it and it can solve the fiscal problems of this country or take us in the right direction. but we don't have something like that. instead we have a plan that says the following and puts it in the constitution, the guy who runs an ethanol company who gets massive public subsidies can make profits is completely left alone. he doesn't have to do anything. but for the woman who cleans his office at night is going to have to pay more to go to college, more for health care for herself, her children and her parents and more for just about anything she wants in her life. there's something wrong with that picture. sacrifice that is broadly shared is needed in
iraq and afghanistan sooner than many here would like or that the president would like, and save substantial sums if we do that. most certainly if we're going to go forward with shared sacrifice, yes, we do have to ask billions, despite all of their power and all of their campaign contributions and all of their lobbying, maybe the billionaires who are doing phenomenally well may have to contribute to deficit reduction. yes, maybe those companies that stash their money in tax hyphens in pwerpld and the cayman eye hraldz -- in bermuda and the cayman islands, maybe they are going to have to start paying their fair share. on my web site which is sanders.senate.gov, i put a small letter which said to the president, mr. president, stand tall. take on these right-wing ideologues who want to make devastating cuts to working families. and in a couple of weeks we have 135,000 signatures on that letter, and i think that letter reflects what the american people want. they want shared sacrifice. they do not want to see the elderly, the kids or working families being battered more and more, es
administration. mr. courtney: starting with iraq and afghanistan wars, two wars which, again, lots of debate about whether it was in our national interest, but in any case what is not debatable is that we never paid for a penny of either one of those conflicts. the bush tax cuts, $1.8 trillion . nondefense discretionary spending, $608 billion. tarp, the wall street bailout, which a lot of people forget occurred under the last administration, a medicare drug benefit which was passed in 2005 which was never paid for, not a nickel of that benefit was ever paid for. we were either offsetting revenue or other -- with either offsetting revenue or other spending reductions. and the 2008 stimulus bill which the bush administration had presented, a lot of people don't remember the check they got sent during that time for, again, none of those expenditures were paid for and many of those expenditures such as the bush tax cuts and the iraq and afghanistan war are still recurring expenses which are still accumulating bills and debts which this country is obligated for. when the obama administration took
the savings would come from iraq and afghanistan and don't materialize and votes on a balanced budget amendment but what the democrats reviews to do is tie an increase in the debt ceiling to passing the balanced budget amendment. you can see the rough outlines of a deal. any deal would have to go back to the house. would these conservatives especially tea party members that speaker boehner had to make concessions to, what would they do if it comes back monday night just hours before the deadline, would they vote for that? >> 201 votes in favor of this legislation. right now 196. take a look. as of now 12 republicans have bolted from the leadership from john boehner, the speaker, and eric cantor the majority leader and right now 12 republicans have voted against and still not there. 216. there is still plenty of time left. nine minutes plus for this vote to conclude. it's a fascinating development as you say. by the way, we're told john boehner was mulling around and didn't seem overly concerned but it is still not a done deal yet. once this does pass, john, assuming it passes, gets 21
with bills and insurance companies. soldiers, in too many cases returning from iraq and afghanistan, are facing even greater challenges in the working market. i was at youngstown university talking, there are programs there, there's a group through magnet in youngstown in northeast ohio about putting -- getting -- helping soldiers and sailors and marines leaving the service, integrating into the classroom and helping them find jobs in that region, someplace we've fallen woefully short. manufacturing, which was moving along steadily earlier this year, we had seen 12, 13, 14, 15 months of job growth in manufacturing, not enough job growth but some, that's even slowing down. steps taken through the auto rescue and other things we did in the last couple of years dealing with this terrible, terrible recession created in 2007 and 2008 the auto rescue saved millions -- auto rescue and other efforts saved millions of americans from joining the unemployment rolls and we're seeing a better auto industry, an auto industry coming back, especially in places like defiance and toledo and northwood
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)